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Where Dreams Come True

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For years, my daughter and I have enjoyed annual road trips. There’s nothing like good old-fashion “girl time.”

This year, we added a new member, my three-year-old granddaughter, Audrey. It’s an opportunity for three generations to make memories, and our first adventure was Disneyland.

I guess I’m an introvert because I felt claustrophobic by the sea of people at the park. I was traumatized by the magical madness, but from Audrey’s perspective, it was a magical kingdom where dreams come true.

 

Similarities Instead of Differences

Disney

At Fantasyland, we rode It’s a Small World. My daughter had been to Disneyland numerous times, but the ride was closed each time. It was a first experience.

My daughter and granddaughter became world travelers in seven minutes. They watched colorful dolls in traditional costumes sing in different languages.

The song stuck in my head for hours, but so did the message. It was a beautiful reminder of world unity. It’s only through the eyes of a child that we see humanity’s similarities instead of its differences.

That afternoon, we took a swim break. Audrey splashed in the wading pool. Kids gathered to splash around and make friends. Audrey approach a little girl who was alone, “Want to be my friend?” she asked.

The little girl smiled, and they played together in the wading pool. The little girl’s mother looked relieved as she tenderly watched her down-syndrome daughter play with Audrey.

 

Where Dreams Come True

At the end of the day, I wondered what a three-year-old’s dream would teach us? On the surface, they’re captivated by fairy tales, princesses, and adventure experiences. Dreams offer security knowing that good prevailed over evil—happy endings. But underneath every fairytale, character, and adventure experience, there’s usually a redemptive story, unconditional love, and purpose. It’s a purpose that goes beyond the story and into the future—a forever and ever future.

Perhaps they’re instinctively seeking God’s story. A story about a beautiful kingdom where a loving King lives, and waits for his family—a family that includes everyone from every nation. It’s a story where good conquered evil and offers hope. It’s a story we need to remember and share.

 

Ever After

I hope this is the first of many mother, daughter, and granddaughter road trips. This trip reminded me to see the world through the eyes of a child. Childlike faith that understands God’s story and practices unconditional love while we wait for our dream to come true, to live our “ever after” with Jesus Christ.

Blessings!

Marisa Shadrick

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3 Responses

  1. I’m a white male with an African American wife and child and one child sharing both ancestries. I We live in a small predominantly white town. This community is loving and open minded as a whole. Every day I see the eyes looking at us, assessing us. Children never judge. They openly play and befriend my children. Some have the courage to ask about the obvious difference out of curiosity and wanting to understand the world. Occasionally there is an adult in the crowd that has disapproval on their face and in their body language, but do not voice their position.

    God’s gift to us is available to all of us. I choose to accept it!

    1. Amen, Loren.

      We live in a fallen word, but each day we pray, “Thy kingdom come thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven,” we can influence the world in a positive way.

      Blessings to you and your family!

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